The society that separates its scholars from its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting by fools.

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Indeed it is generally the case that men are readier to call rogues clever than simpletons honest, and are ashamed of being the second as they are proud of being the first.

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When one is deprived of ones liberty, one is right in blaming not so much the man who puts the shackles on as the one who had the power to prevent him, but did not use it.

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Of all manifestations of power, restraint impresses men the most.

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For the whole earth is the tomb of famous men; not only are they commemorated by columns and inscriptions in their own country, but in foreign lands there dwells also an unwritten memorial of them, graven not on stone but in the hearts of men. Make them your examples, and, esteeming courage to be freedom and freedom to be happiness, do not weigh too nicely the perils of war. [Funeral Oration of Pericles]”

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It is frequently a misfortune to have very brilliant men in charge of affairs. They expect too much of ordinary men.

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When these matters are discussed by practical people, the standard of justice depends on the equality of power to compel.

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A collision at sea will ruin your entire day.

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Peace is an armistice in a war that is continuously going on.

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For these reasons they should not hesitate to exchange peace for war. If wise men remain quiet, while they are not injured, brave men abandon peace for war when they are injured, returning to an understanding on a favourable opportunity: in fact, they are neither intoxicated by their success in war, nor disposed to take an injury for the sake of the delightful tranquility of peace. Indeed, to falter for the sake of such delights is, if you remain inactive, the quickest way of losing the sweets of repose to which you cling; while to conceive extravagant pretensions from success in war is to forget how hollow is the confidence by which you are elated.

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The strong do what they have to do and the weak accept what they have to accept.

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It is the habit of mankind to entrust to careless hope what they long for, and to use sovereign reason to thrust aside what they do not desire.

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